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Archive for the ‘recipes’ Category

Passover is around the corner! We are getting busy cooking (and listening to some Passover music and some traditional renditions of the HAGGADAH in the Rhodesli Tradition by Neil Sheff, to get us in the mood! Listen along with us!)

While listening today, I was remembering the Birkat Amazon as I had learned it in Seattle, “Ya Komimos.” Thanks to my Facebook friend Louise Chiprut Berman, I immediately had the words at my fingertips. I could hear most of it in my memory, missing a line or two. Asking on Facebook, Bryan Kirschen was able to post Hazan Isaac Azose singing it exactly as I remembered! AH, such happy memories…..and the wonders of Facebook!
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Cooking with my Mom. Making Keftes de Prassa….a family favorite. We serve Prassa (leek patties) at Pesah as they are a spring vegetable.  We also serve them at Rosh Hashanah as part of the ‘yehi ratzonis’ – the Rosh Hashanah Seder.

Our family makes them without meat…..a good option for the vegetarians at your Seder. (some have the tradition of adding ground beef to their leek patties.)

This is my mom’s method for Keftes de Prassa.

Ingredients:

1 large onion – chopped

8 medium stalks of leek

3 eggs

2 tblsp matzah meal

1 C mashed potato or 1 C mashed potato flakes

pepper to taste

*optional pinch of red pepper flakes

Prepare leeks. Cut 1/4″ from top and bottom.

Cut in half vertically.

Soak and clean leeks throughly. (leeks, by nature, often have a good amount of fine dirt between leaves. Make sure to clean carefully) Soak, rinse, soak again (2 – 3 times).

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Cut into 1/2″ pieces.

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Boil cut leek and chopped onion in a pot of water ( covering mixture), until vegetables are soft and limp. Boil Potato separately until soft.

Drain (squeeze out) all liquid. Add additional ingredients. Blend into an even leek-onion-potato mixture. Shape into patties.

Fry : 2/3 C oil

Fry on medium heat until both sides are slightly browned.

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Drain on a paper towel. Divine freshly made…..can be frozen, sealed tight.

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Defrost and place on a cookie sheet and warm in the oven at 300 degrees for about 10 minutes, or until warmed throughly.

Enjoy!!!!!!

Love hearing what you’re making and doing for the holidays. Stay in touch with us here and on Facebook at ‘Bendichas Manos!’

~ Kaye & Marcia

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A favorite for Pesah….delightful as a pareve dessert during the year!

Ingredients:

2 C blanched almonds

1 C sugar

2 eggs…whites only

Grind blanched almonds to near a fine consistency.

Mix in a bowl with sugar.

Add egg whites to almonds and sugar.  Mix until biscuit-dough consistency. Using a tablespoon or metal scoop, drop 1″ apart on cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.  Bake for 10 minutes in a pre-heated 350 degree oven.

Marichinos out of Oven Seph Shabbat Jan 2018

Allow to cool completely before handling. Will harden as they cool.

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Hanukkah celebrates the re-dedication of the Temple in Jerusalem after the Jewsih victory over the Greeks in 165 BCE.

A favorite story is the Miracle of the Oil. The Jews went to reclaim and restore the Temple in Jerusalem after it had been defiled and left in ruins by the Greeks. There was only enough oil left to rekindle the candelabra that was to burn throughout the night each and every night. It would be several days before more oil be be procured and prepared. By virtue of a Miracle, the oil burned for 8 days and nights, until more oil was available.

To commemorate the Miracle, we prepare foods cooked in oil for the holiday of Hanukkah. Favorites are latkes (potato pancakes), sufganiyot (filled donuts), and in our family, burmuelos (fried dough).

Growing up, I had never had latkes. Our Hannukah treat was always burmuelos – light, fried dough pillows bathed in a light, sweet syrup that is absolutely devine!

Made from a yeast dough, it takes some time for the dough to rise and be ready to fry. My mom will make the dough ahead of time and after dinner, drop the dough by spoonfuls into hot oil, watch them puff and turn a golden brown as she prepares the honey syrup. Once the burmuelos are ready, she will bathe them in syrup and we’ll eat them, warm and fresh! Divine, indeed!

Below is the recipe. Give them a try…..and enjoy!

My Mom uses the recipe from the cookbook,

    The Sephardic Cooks – Come Con Gana

compiled by the Sisterhood of Congregation Or Ve Shalom in Atlanta, GA.

1 tsp yeast
1/2 C and 1 1/2 C warm water
pinch of salt
3 C flour
1 egg
oil (for frying)

Soften yeast in 1/2 cup warm water. In mixing bowl add dry ingredients. Add yeast mixture, egg and remaining warm water. MIx well. Allow to rise in covered bowl in warm place for 2 hours.

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Fill a quart pot with 3 inches of cooking oil. Allow to get very hot.

 

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Drop a teaspoon of soft dough into the hot oil.

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Remove with slotted spoon when golden brown. Bathe in syrup.

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Syrup

1 C sugar
3 Tblsps honey
1/2 C water

Boil together until sticky. Pour over burmuelos.

A wonderful message about the Miracle of Hanukkah shared by Craig Taubman:

“The miracle of Hanukka is not that the oil burned for 8 days. The true miracle? That someone was inspired to light the light in the first place!”

Let us be inspired!!

Bendichas Manos!!!!

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I had the delightful treat to be in Judy Zeidler’s kitchen last week when she made fresh homemade ricotta chesse. Growing up, ricotta was a staple in our Sephardic kitchen.   Used in recipes such as our quajados and served with olive oil with home made bread…..ricotta, with it’s velvety smooth texture is a certain favorite. I was tickled when Judy told us she was making it for us!

With her permission, I’m printing her recipe today in hopes that you might include it in your Shavuot menu.

Judy’s Homemade Ricotta Cheese

1/2 gallon whole milk

1 cup cream

2 teaspoons salt

6 tablespoons lemon juice

Heat the milk, cream and salt over meadium heat until it is about to boil.

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Add the lemon juice, stir a few times and when the mixture begins to curdle, remove from the heat.  Let curds rest for a minute or two.

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Using a slotted spoon, skim the Ricotta curds from the whey and place them in a colander or wire sieve lined with cheesecloth.  Drain for 15 minutes.

Serve warm or at room temperature, with a drizzle of honey.

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(Marcia’s note….it was delicious with a drizzle of honey.  At our house, we would likely drizzle with a bit of olive oil and perhaps a squeeze of lemon).

Try it and let us know how you enjoyed it!

Thank you to Judy Zeidler for this wonderful recipe.  Check out her book, ‘Italy Cooks,’ which has this and other wonderful recipes and stories from her travels in Italy, as well as her other creatively delightful cookbooks by visiting http://www.judyzeidler.com.

As we celebrate the receiving of the Torah, we share an array of dairy dishes….boyos, burekas, quajados, sutlach, cheeses of all sorts, (thus, Ricotta!)….and our friends share blintzes, cheese kugles, knishes, etc.  As mother’s milk (dairy) nourishes a body to grow;  so, too, Torah nourishes our souls.

Wishing you all a joyous and meaningful Shavuot….and delicious treats to go along with it!

~ Bendichas Manos

 

 

 

 

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Tomorrow is a cooking day…..and tomorrow night marks the first night of Passover – the first Seder. We’re all busy preparing our homes, shopping, and preparing for the holiday.  I thank you for allowing me to share one last message before we begin the Festival.
This is a time for gathering together. We read the Haggadah and tell the story of our delivery as a people from slavery in Egypt to freedom in the land of Israel. It is a cornerstone of our being a people. So central is the journey from slavery to freedom, from oppression to self-reliance, that we retell this story each year. We can only appreciate our freedom if we remember our enslavement. We can only appreciate our wholeness of we remember our brokenness. We can only appreciate our own land of Israel, a home for all the Jewish people, if we recall our desperation and desolation when we had nowhere else to turn.
So – we tell the story, year after year, from generation to generation. And with the telling, we serve our favorite foods. Again, passing from one generation to the next our savory dishes, favorite recipes, each with a special name, with special textures and flavors and all with their own memories. These are the stories – and the foods, that bind us together as a people and keep us connected as a family. How very strong is the bond that stories – and food – provides!
Our family Passover seder this year will bring together a big group – mashala!- all somehow connected to my grandparents, of blessed memory, Isaac (Hacco) Hasson and Sarota Benveniste Hasson. Both were born on the Island of Rhodes (at the time part of the Ottoman empire, Turkey), at the end of the 19th century. Could they ever had imagined that over a hundred years later, their children, grandchildren, down to their great great great grandchildren would still be connected, gathering together (in person and via Facebook) to remember their names, remember their stories, and together carry on the traditions that they, too, brought forth from the generations before them! How wonderful that is!
Our Seder will include readings, stories and songs in English, Hebrew and Ladino, the Judeo-Spanish of our Sephardic family. The foods will be leaven free with flavors and names related to our Turkish, Spanish, Mediterranean roots.
We hope the recipes, stories and links we’ve shared with each other help to entice, and enrich our experiences and strengthen our bonds.

May you enjoy your time together with family and friends; may you tell the story of our people and the lessons of our journey. May you tell stories and remember those of our families who are no longer with us physically, so their memories stay alive in our hearts and those of our children and their lives continue to bless us. May we keep the traditions of our ancestors and create new ones with our children. May our gatherings bring blessings – and may our hands, the hands that prepare these foods that nourish our souls and keep our traditions alive, always be blessed.
Pesah Alegre!
~ Bendichas Manos

Marcia Weingarten
http://BendichasManos.com
On Facebook: Bendichas Manos!

 

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After a whirlwind trip to New York for a very special wedding, I returned home and got into ‘Pesah Prep’ mode.  When I walked into my mom’s home on Sunday morning, she had already prepared and fried 6 dozen Keftes de Prassa!! She knows they are a favorite for so many in our family and she wanted to make sure she had them made and ready for the family to enjoy!!

We serve Prassa (leeks) at Pesah as they are a spring vegetable.  We also serve them at Rosh Hashanah as part of the ‘yehi ratzonis’ – the Rosh Hashanah Seder.

In our family, there are vegetarians – (other families make them with ground meat.)
This is my mom’s method for Keftes de Prassa.

Ingredients:

1 large onion – chopped

8 medium stalks of leek

3 eggs

2 tblsp matzah meal

1 C mashed potato or 1 C mashed potato flakes

pepper to taste

*optional pinch of red pepper flakes

*****(One side note – for ease of preparation: Trader Joe’s has packages of pre-cut leek in the freezer section – cuts down on preparation time!  Boil the leek for about 20 − 30 minutes until soft. Rise under cool water. Squeeze water from leek. (then squeeze again – and again. Then, just one more time – it is amazing how match liquid can be removed, and so doing will help ensure the best possible results.  Separately chop and boil the onion in a pot of water. Then continue as below.)

Prepare leeks. Cut 1/4″ from top and bottom. Cut in half vertically. Soak and clean leeks throughly. (leeks, by nature, often have a good amount of fine dirt between leaves. Make sure to clean carefully) Cut into 1/2″ pieces.

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Boil cut leek and chopped onion in a pot of water ( covering mixture), until vegetables are soft and limp.

Drain ( squeeze out) all liquid. Add additional ingredients. Blend into an even leek-onion mixture. Shape into patties.

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Fry : 2/3 C oil

Fry on medium heat until both sides are slightly browned.

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Drain on a paper towel. Divine freshly made…..can be frozen, sealed tight.

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Defrost and place on a cookie sheet and warm in the oven at 300 degrees for about 10 minutes, or until warmed throughly.

Enjoy!!!!!!

~ Bendichas Manos

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One of our family favorites is Sevollas Reinados, stuffed onions.  Savory and delicious, with a simple substitution, it can be Pesah friendly, and always appreciated as part of a holiday meal.   These are made with ground beef (although I prepare it with ground chicken which makes it a bit lighter, and my family prefers the taste.)  Another item that can be made ahead and frozen.  Give it a try and let us know what you think!

Approx 12 smaller sized onions

1 C matzah meal

1 lb ground beef

1 egg

S & P to taste

‘Handful’ of chopped parsley – I recommend 3/4 C (you can substitute or mix in cilantro for a punch)

1 beat egg  and 1 C matzah flour or matzah meal to use to coat top of each before browning

Sauce:

I C tomato sauce

1 C water

1 tsp sugar

 

Cut onions in half lengthwise.

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Separate outer layers in double thickness.  (Save inner  pieces)

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Combine ground beef, egg, parsley,  and chopped onion (from inner core saved when separating sections.)  (You knew we’d use them sonewhere!).  Add matzah meal.

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Fill onion shells with this mixture

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Dip meat side into matzah flour or matzah meal then into beaten egg before placing into frying pan with heated oil to brown.

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After browning, place meat side up in casserole pan in which bottom has been covered with remaining sliced and chopped onions.

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Cover with sauce made of tomato sauce, water and a tsp of sugar.  Cover casserole and bake in oven at 300 degrees for 1 hour.

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This is one of many stuffed vegetable dishes we frequently prepare – stuffing tomatoes, zucchinis, small eggplants, bell peppers, cabbage leaves.  During the year, instead of matzah meal we often add bread crumbs or softened slices of bread for a binder – some use potato flakes (I like to use Panko).  Often, a ‘grainiko’  (a small grain – a handful) of rice is added to the meat mixture.    { I would make a heartier sauce – tomato sauce, lemon juice, water, garlic, S & P – and simmer it while I prepare my vegetables.  Then pour it over the vegetables.  That would make much more ‘caldo’ (sauce) when the stuffed vegetables are served with rice and the sauce spooned over the rice – but that’s for another time during the year!}

So many dishes to prepare for the week!   My mom has already started!  There is megina (Meat and matzah quajado), a delicious new chicken to try from Rachel Sheff (SEC Food Group  on Facebook ) Keftes de prassa (Leek patties), Bamya (okra), my cousin Sarita will make our family’s Haroset – then there’s the desserts – marochinos (almond macaroons),  mustachudos (nut confections), ashuplados (meringue clouds)…… wow!

Some of the best memories are made while preparing and cooking for the holidays.  Spend time with your families.  Remember and reflect on holidays past – tell stories; remember relatives. L’dor v’dor.  This is how we keep traditions fresh – how we keep memories alive.

Which reminds me – watch the movie ‘Coco,’ the new Pixar/Disney film.  Beautiful lessons on family, traditions, memory.   Nice to share other’s cultural traditions – nice to know the similarities we share – the importance of family and memory.  Beautiful film.  Perfect season to share it.

Busy time in the kitchen. We’ll share more in the days to come.  Looking forward to hearing of your menus, your traditions and your memories.

May your hands always be blessed!

~Bandichas Manos

 

 

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